Details for English: Part A

This subject enables students to establish an introduction to contemporary theories and practices about language and literacy education with an emphasis on the teaching of reading and visual communication techniques. This subject provides 'real life' examples as a means of contextualising theories within the theory and practice of explicit teaching.


Quick Info

  • Currently offered by Alphacrucis: Yes
  • Course code: CRS203
  • Credit points: 10
  • Subject coordinator: Stephen Brinton

Prerequisites

The following courses are prerequisites:

Awards offering English: Part A

This unit is offered as a part of the following awards:

Unit Content

Curriculum Objective

This subject enables students to establish an introduction to contemporary theories and practices about language and literacy education with an emphasis on the teaching of reading and visual communication techniques. This subject provides 'real life' examples as a means of contextualising theories within the theory and practice of explicit teaching. Topics include a critique of several models of instruction, which influence teaching across the language/literacy areas. Reference to the relevant K-6 Syllabi are made and a variety of curriculum frameworks are explored while learning about the crafting of programs and lesson plans. 

Outcomes

  1. In response to the importance and value of reflective practice, journal the growth in your knowledge and understanding throughout this subject.
  2. Structure and organise a micro-teaching lesson demonstrating content knowledge and connection with cross-curriculum priorities, to design differentiated learning experience that engage students from diverse backgrounds (culturally and linguistically)
  3. With reference to the ACARA English curriculum or the NESA English K-10 Syllabus and with insight into the theory and practice of reading, critique traditional reading approaches.
  4. Create an annotated resource text pack for the teaching of reading in a Christian or alternate school context.

Subject Content

  1. Broad and critical knowledge and understanding of the nature of English as a language of communication for participation in society through reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing experiences, ideas and values; English as a discipline including recent theory and practice related to acquisition of reading, writing, speaking, listening and visual literacy. Consideration of models of pedagogy for early language and literacy development, e.g. Literature-based, Whole Language, Systemic and functional linguistics, genre-based, thematic, integration across the curriculum; visual language; vocabulary; alphabetic knowledge; responding to literature; figurative language e.g. poetry; listening and speaking interactions; oral presentations; reading processes; comprehension strategies;
  2. Visual literacy model: represent actions, objects and settings, create interactive or interpersonal meanings between viewer and what is being viewed (colour, angles, shot distance, media etc.), present layout choices that indicate value and emphasis. Role of advertising and mass media communications; Early Literacy development strategies: - implementation of Phonemic awareness, phonic fluency, vocab knowledge and text comprehension, concepts of print, grammar and punctuation, spelling and handwriting, drama and role play; Introduction to a wide range of texts including literary, factual and multimedia texts; study of literature that gives insights into Aboriginal, multicultural and children’s experiences, for example texts from Australia and other countries, and children’s literature; knowledge of teaching strategies that are responsive to the learning strengths and needs of students from diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds;
  3. Explicit teaching and demonstration in the Christian and alternate school context: focusing instruction on identified curriculum content (NESA/ACARA); connecting to prior knowledge and skills when beginning a learning sequence; teaching and expecting students to use metalanguage in ways that support learning; deconstructing and sequencing teaching to focus on the steps that lead to new knowledge, deeper understandings and/or more sophisticated skill; varying instruction in response to immediate and reflective feedback asking questions to continually monitor understanding and progress and inform immediate feedback; verbal and non-verbal cues; providing scaffolded learning experiences for students to practise, synthesise and consolidate learning; developing the capability of students to self-regulate and learn independently;
  4. Strategies to engage students in multicultural and multilingual classes to read and compose texts more effectively and value English literacy acquisition. Different theoretical frameworks for teaching EALD students and 1st phase learners; culturally inclusive curriculum; use of interpreters, collaborating with bilingual families and agencies. Language of power:- access to institutions, choice and empowerment, exclusivity and inclusivity, cross cultural advantage and disadvantage, what counts as success in Australian Indigenous communities; Australian Indigenous identity, worldview and language; Aboriginal English and Standard Australian English; ‘two-way/both ways’ bidialectal pedagogy; building on Aboriginal students’ prior learning;
  5. Programming and strategies for inclusivity; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Special Needs, Children with challenging behaviours, EALD, TESOL; and organizing and catering for multi-staged classroom settings, negotiated curriculum. Scaffolding literacy learning strategies for Stages 2-3, e.g. critical constructive reading and viewing, intermediality, Reciprocal Reading, independent, guided, modelled and shared reading and writing, genre based, LDC (Literacy, Development Cycle - modelling, negotiating the field, text deconstruction (critical thinking, higher order thinking and critical literacy, levels of questioning), joint construction, independent construction), dictogloss subject specialist literacy, identifying important, substantive concepts skills and ideas, Learning Centres, ability and multi-staged grouping (see also Bickmore-Brand Strategy Chart for Kolb’s Learning Styles and Bloom’s Taxonomy of Thinking).

This course may be offered in the following formats

  • Face-to-Face
  • Distance/ Global Online

Please consult your course prospectus or enquire about how and when this course will be offered next at Alphacrucis College.

Assessment Methods

  1. Reflective Journal (20%)
  2. Minor Essay (30%)
  3. Resources Review (50%)

Prescribed Text

  • References will include the most current curriculum requirements for schools.

Check with the instructor each semester before purchasing any prescribed texts or representative references