Details for History and Geography: Part B

This subject explores the discipline of History, the study of the past. Specifically, consideration is given to how history relates to humans, memory, commemorations, discoveries, artefact collection and preservation, the role of immigration, how we interpret and learn from the past, including the role of Aboriginal and Torres St Islanders in Australian history past and present and how Australia’s federal system operates.


Quick Info

  • Currently offered by Alphacrucis: Yes
  • Course code: CRS302
  • Credit points: 10
  • Subject coordinator: Jim Twelves

Prerequisites

The following courses are prerequisites:

Awards offering History and Geography: Part B

This unit is offered as a part of the following awards:

Unit Content

Curriculum Objective

This subject explores the discipline of History, the study of the past. Specifically, consideration is given to how history relates to humans, memory, commemorations, discoveries, artefact collection and preservation, the role of immigration, and how we interpret and learn from the past, including the role of Aboriginal and Torres St Islanders in Australian history past and present, as well as a study of democracy and how Australia’s federal system operates. History naturally opens many prospects for integration with other KLAs. The study of History and Geography assists in the development of a deeper understanding of the pre-service teachers’ worldviews, Australia’s Indigenous and multicultural society and the concept of stewardship.

Outcomes

  1. Justify the importance of the History K-10 syllabus in the context of contemporary multi-faith societies and in the light of the pre-service teachers’ developing philosophy of Christian education;
  2. Critically analyse historical and geographical issues and debates pertaining to globalisation; 
  3. Critically evaluate the historical development of Australian society, including Australian Indigenous history, and identify potential models for future peace and prosperity and the role of schools;
  4. Reconstruct the historical development of the changes over the past 30 years to the Australian History Curriculum (re- Australian society, including Australian Indigenous history), and identify potential models for future peace and prosperity;
  5. Design programs for sustainable earth stewardship, according to the biblical mandate, that capture the imagination of young people and ultimately change society’s values.

Subject Content

  1. Establish the relationship between the ACARA History Curriculum F-6/7, NESA History K–10 Syllabus (Stages 1 to 3) and school implementation with particular emphasis on the general capabilities and cross curriculum priorities.
  2. The aims, rationale and sequential development of the NESA History K–10 Syllabus, the value of support documents in developing effective teaching and learning programs that support student academic achievement, the wider goals of society and whole person development.
  3. Place of History in the continuum of learning in K-12, including a particular understanding of the links between Stage 3 and Stage 4; as well as the aim, objectives, outcomes, content, course requirements and key terms.
  4. Place of history within the Christian and alternate school contexts.
  5. Broad and critical knowledge and understanding of the range of academic disciplines related to human society and its environment, including recent theory and practice; key themes in History: thinking historically, global considerations; multifaith and multicultural society; world-wide faith education and its impact on Australian Indigenous communities and education; knowledge of teaching strategies that are responsive to the learning strengths and needs of students from diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds; knowledge and understanding of strategies for differentiating teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities;
  6. Australian diversity and the role of non-English speaking and multilingual communities; immigration and anti-racism polices; policies and decisions affecting citizenship; Australian democratic system and responsibilities; civics and citizenship education; disabilities services; heritage education;
  7. Social justice, reconciliation and educational disadvantage: rural and remote communities; Non-English Speaking Backgrounds (EALD); Australian Indigenous communities and kinship, consultation protocols and sensitivities; health & welfare inequalities; child protection agencies;
  8. Personal worldview development: understanding the role of history in shaping worldview; awareness of cultural sensitivities;
  9. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders: the impact of historical and current policies and practices; successful Australian Indigenous people; institutional education; self-determination; self-sufficiency;
  10. Epistemological and pedagogical theories that inform social sciences; teaching strategies; classroom environments; treatment of values; approaches to planning and assessment both formative and summative;

This course may be offered in the following formats

  • Face-to-Face
  • Distance/ Global Online

Please consult your course prospectus or enquire about how and when this course will be offered next at Alphacrucis College.

Assessment Methods

  1. Major Essay (50%)
  2. Individual Essay and YouTube Clip (30%)
  3. Assessing a Unit of Work (20%)

Prescribed Text

  • References will include the most current curriculum requirements for schools.

Check with the instructor each semester before purchasing any prescribed texts or representative references